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  • Oct 24, 2016   |   Hong Kong Statement on basel action newwork e-trash transparency project report
    Statement on basel action newwork e-trash transparency project report
    HONG KONG – An E-Trash Transparency Project report from Basel Action Network (BAN) that GPS-tracked 200 electronic waste products cites a printer that was exported from the United States and disposed of at a non-certified facility in New Territories, Hong Kong. In this report, Good Point Recycling, a US-based electronics recycler, claims this device was provided to Li Tong Group for processing through its downstream partner, ARCOA Group. The BAN report disputes this claim, and after a thorough internal investigation Li Tong Group can confirm the BAN Report findings that this device was never provided to Li Tong Group. In fact, Li Tong Group has never conducted business with either Good Point Recycling or ARCOA Group.

    Li Tong Group can also confirm that it did not receive any printer of the model in question from any partners in Hong Kong during the time period covered by the BAN study. Li Tong Group has never conducted any business whatsoever with the non-certified New Territories facility cited in the BAN Report.

    As a leading provider of reverse supply chain management solutions for the world’s top tech and telecomm companies, Li Tong Group prides itself on commercially and environmentally sustaining practices. Li Tong Group encourages accountability and is fully committed to transparency and sustainability at all of its facilities.

    The Li Tong Group facilities located in Hong Kong are fully compliant with the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department’s (EPD) local regulations. It holds EPD licensure as a Registered Waste Producer that ensures the disposal, collection and transport of waste is carried out in a manner that prevents and mitigates environmental damage. Li Tong Group also holds EPD licensures for the Disposal of Chemical Waste.

    These Hong Kong-based facilities are ISO 9001:2008, ISO 14001:2004 and OHSAS 18001:2007 certified for asset recovery and electronics recycling—using advanced technical expertise and specialized processes for collecting, sorting, dismantling and recycling electronic waste for its clients.

    Li Tong Group also holds several internationally recognized standards certificates for the recycling industry, including R2 (Responsible Recycling) and RIOS (Recycling Industry Operating Standard)—the highest standard for the electronics recycling industry. Li Tong Group was the first company in the Asia-Pacific region to hold both R2 and RIOS certification.
  • may 24, 2016   |   Adele Peters/ Co.Exist Your Old Smartphone May Finally Be Recycled In A Smarter Way
    Your Old Smartphone May Finally Be Recycled In A Smarter Way
    Instead of shredding gadgets and melting materials, a Hong Kong company uses tools to carefully separate parts so they can be reused.

    When Apple announced that it collected 2,204 pounds of gold from old

    electronics through its recycling programs in 2015, headlines speculated that the company made $40 million in the process. That wasn't true: To comply with producer responsibility laws, Apple pays recyclers to handle piles of old gadgets. The value of precious metals might help offset that cost, but it isn't a way to rake in cash.

    In fact, traditional recycling—which shreds down old gadgets and then attempts to separate old materials such as gold—is a poor way to recover either the value of components or the environment footprint it took to make them. But recycling is beginning to evolve.


    Hong Kong-based Li Tong Group (LTG), which operates 21 recycling facilities around the world, is one of the pioneers of newer methods of recycling. Instead of shredding gadgets and melting materials, the company uses new tools to carefully separate parts so they can be reused in something new.

    "When you smelted something, you pretty much get nothing from it," says Linda Li, chief strategy officer at LTG. "No value recovery from it. The raw material value barely pays for the cost of recycling. Whereas now there are actually a lot of non-proprietary, generic parts from a defective product that can be reused."

    When an old phone or tablet goes through the company's recycling process, first all of the data is erased. Then, after some visual inspection, the gadget is disassembled into parts such as the LCD display and battery pack. This requires specialized tools that are designed to get around products that were never designed to be disassembled into components.


    Certain proprietary parts have to be destroyed because manufacturers don't want the IP stolen. But other generic parts can be reused, whole, in new products. An LCD screen from an old tablet could become a screen in the back of a taxi. A camera in a phone might be reused in a toy that needs a camera. In some cases, old phone parts might end up in a new, lower-end phone. Other companies might use them to repair or refurbish old gadgets.

    By using whole components instead of materials, it's possible both to recover more financial value and have a much greater environmental impact. If you recycle silver the traditional way, it still needs to be processed into a new part; while you save the environmental impact of digging it up from the ground again, there's often a bigger carbon footprint involved with the rest of the manufacturing process.


    In a lifecycle study LTG commissioned, they found that by repurposing an LCD screen alone, they could help a manufacturer save 70%-80% of the carbon footprint. "Traditional methods focus on smelting down the motherboard and maybe recovering some gold and silver, but we have found that actually the motherboard doesn't generate a lot of carbon footprint savings for you at all," Li says. "It's in the LCD."

    Traditional recycling might not even touch an LCD at all, because it's mostly glass and doesn't have a financial value. "In our method, you save the whole thing," she says.

    The company serves manufacturers such as Microsoft, Apple, Motorola, and Amazon. Other processes are also becoming more sophisticated, like Apple's new 29-arm robot that can automatically disassemble an iPhone 6s.

    The challenge, however, is partly getting old electronics to the right places so they can be recycled into higher-value materials. Of the 93 million tons of e-waste that may be generated this year, much of it is likely to end up in dumps. Other gadgets still end up in developing countries, in places where "recycling" might mean burning toxic plastic parts over a fire. The challenge of collection will keep growing: E-waste is growing two to three times faster than any other type of waste.
  • February 17, 2016   |   Tim Culpan/ Bloomberg Where Your iPhone Goes to Die (and Be Reborn)
    Where Your iPhone Goes to Die (and Be Reborn)
    At a dedicated factory with 24-hour security in an undisclosed location in Hong Kong, iPhones are being carefully and meticulously destroyed.

    The plant is one of a handful around the world, chosen by Apple Inc. to grind up and recycle its iconic phones. And just as the companies that manufacture the handsets are subject to strict standards and secrecy, the same applies in reverse for their disassembly, right down to weighing the shreds, to make sure nothing is lost.

    Apple has sold more than 570 million iPhones since that January morning nine years ago when Steve Jobs stepped on stage in San Francisco to “reinvent the phone.” Even Apple doesn’t know how many of those phones are still out there -- in the hands of their second, third or fourth owner, or sitting forgotten in a drawer. But the company wants to ensure as few as possible end up in landfills.

    That’s the job of the plant in an industrial park in Hong Kong’s Yuen Long district belonging to Apple contractor Li Tong Group. This is where iPhones, iPads and iMacs come to die.

    While global brands including HP, Huawei, Amazon and Microsoft also have detailed protocols for recycling their products, Apple’s are the most rigid and exacting, according to people involved in the processes, who declined to be identified because they’re not authorized to speak about clients.

    "I think people expect it of us, I think our customers hold us to a high standard," Lisa Jackson, Apple’s head of environmental affairs, said by phone from the company’s Cupertino headquarters. "It’s difficult, because these are incredibly complex pieces of product."

    Neither Apple nor Li Tong would provide access to the Hong Kong facility, say how many units it recycles, or give specifics of the de-manufacturing process.


    In the electronics recycling business, the benchmark is to try to collect and recycle 70 percent, by weight, of the devices produced seven years earlier. Jackson says Apple exceeds that, typically reaching 85 percent, including recycling some non-Apple products that customers bring in.

    That means it will have to get hold of and destroy the equivalent of more than 9 million of 2009’s iPhone 3GS models this year around the world. With iPhone sales climbing to 155 million units last fiscal year, grinding up Apple products is a growth business.

    Closely held Li Tong, which also recycles equipment from other manufacturers, has three sites in Hong Kong and a dozen more worldwide. It expects global capacity to climb more than 20 percent this year, including a new facility in San Francisco.

    Apple said it collected more than 40,000 tons of e-waste in 2014 from recycled devices, including enough steel to build 100 miles of railway track.

    Brightstar Corp., based in Miami, Florida, TES-AMM in Singapore, Hong-Kong’s Li Tong and Foxconn Technology Group, the most famous manufacturer of iPhones, are part of a global network of recyclers that agreed to more than 50 rules, ranging from security, to insurance, to auditing, in the destruction of the phones.

    The process starts at hundreds of Apple stores globally, or online, where the company offers gift certificates to lure iPhone owners to sell back their devices.

    After a quick test, the recycler will either buy the phone or offer to scrap it for free. In the U.S., payouts for working phones range from $100 for the smallest-capacity iPhone 4, to $350 for the largest iPhone 6 Plus. More stringent testing then shows whether the handset can be resold or must be scrapped.

    Apple’s U.S. recycler declined to comment while Terence Ng, director of South East Asian partner TES-AMM didn’t respond to e-mail and phone messages. Once Apple’s partners decide a phone must be scrapped, a deconstruction process begins that is remarkably similar to Apple’s production model, only in reverse.

    Apple pays for the service and owns every gram, from the used phone at the start to the pile of dust at the end, said Linda Li, chief strategy officer for Li Tong. The journey, consisting of about 10 steps, is controlled, measured and scripted through vacuum-sealed rooms that are designed to capture 100 percent of the chemicals and gasses released during the process, she said.

    Reclaimed iPhones can’t be shipped across regions, must have their storage wiped, and must have all logos removed. The scrap can’t be mixed with that of other brand names, so recyclers need to have dedicated facilities for Apple, Li said. Apple staff monitor the process at Li Tong’s factory which employs about 300 people.

    While some brands salvage components such as chips that can be used to repair faulty phones, Apple has a full-destruction policy.

    “Shredding components takes more energy than repurposing,” Li said. Li Tong works with other customers to advise on how to design products that are easier to deconstruct, taking cameras from smartphones for reuse in toy drones, and adapting screens from Microsoft Surface tablets to use in New York taxis, she said.


    Apple shreds its devices to avoid having fake Apple products appearing on the secondary market, Jackson said. The company is working on ways to reuse components in the future, she said, declining to elaborate.

    "There’s an e-waste problem in the world," she said. "If we really want to leave the world better than we found it, we have to invest in ways to go further than what happens now."

    And once it’s ground into shreds, what becomes of your old iPhone? Hazardous waste is stored at a licensed facility and the recycling partners can take a commission on other extracted materials such as gold and copper. The rest is reincarnated as aluminum window frames and furniture, or glass tiles.
  • January 14, 2016   |   Hong Kong Li Tong Group’s Consumer Trade-in Program Scores Strong Sustainability, Economic Gains for Microsoft in Hong Kong
    Li Tong Group’s Consumer Trade-in Program Scores Strong Sustainability,
    Economic Gains for Microsoft in Hong Kong

    Mobile phones, laptops and gaming consoles are traded in for discounts on new technologies while legacy devices are harvested for components

    Demonstrating its unique capacity to serve the seemingly disparate goals of reducing clients’ carbon footprints while also boosting sales, the Li Tong Group (LTG) has successfully implemented a technology trade-in program for Microsoft that does exactly that. Since the onset of the program in Hong Kong in May 2015, the all-online electronic product trade-in platform has driven sales of new Microsoft hardware purchases as well as helped the company reach its sustainability goals by reducing the carbon footprint of its manufacturing processes.

    Delivering a positive customer experience is critical to Microsoft and we required a partner who not only understood our range of products and services but also our commitment to service and support,” said Katie Choy, Online Store Manager, Microsoft Hong Kong Ltd. “The team at LTG helped us design, implement and manage every step of our post-consumer trade-in process. With their end-to-end processing capabilities, including data sanitization, refurbishing, repurposing and recycling, the program has allowed us to become more sustainable while also retaining customers long after the initial transaction process.”
  • September 09, 2015   |   Linda Li / EBN Re-Shoring OEMs Challenged to Meet Expectations of Consumers & Regulators
    Re-Shoring OEMs Challenged
    to Meet Expectations of Consumers & Regulators

    As manufacturing returns, a part of its supply chain network also returns; however, it's critical that a robust reverse supply chain management (RSCM) infrastructure be easily accessible so that excess, obsolete and defective parts and products can be handled in an environmentally friendly and cost-effective way.
    For the past few decades, OEMs based in the U.S. have had many good reasons to ship the bulk of their manufacturing and supply chain jobs to other countries in the APAC region. The most compelling reason was that it dramatically reduced costs. Other benefits included less stringent regulations and greater convenience. The massive supply chain network they have built around the world, especially in APAC, is, in the opinion of many, a triumph of globalization.

    That's all changing. The trend began its reversal about three years ago when U.S. President Barack Obama proposed tax incentives meant to encourage companies to return to the U.S. the jobs that had moved overseas. Furthermore, Obama proposed ending or severely reducing tax breaks for businesses that continue to move jobs from the U.S. to other countries. Other factors contributing to the moving of jobs from Asia to the U.S. was the increase in labor costs in some parts of that region and the more consistent pricing of raw materials, which used to be considerably more affordable in Asian countries.

    As manufacturing returns, a part of its supply chain network also returns; however, it's critical that a robust reverse supply chain management (RSCM) infrastructure be easily accessible so that excess, obsolete and defective parts and products can be handled in an environmentally friendly and cost-effective way.

    As of today, that infrastructure is not in place. That's because the decades-long exodus of manufacturing rendered it unnecessary. There was not much of a market domestically for repurposing disposed parts and products here at home in the U.S. The U.S. has focused instead primarily on raw materials recycling and simple waste management.
  • July 30, 2015   |   Hong Kong Li Tong Group (LTG) Launches Motorola’s Online Take-Back Program in France, Germany and the U.K.
    Li Tong Group (LTG) Launches
    Motorola’s Online Take-Back Program
    in France, Germany and the U.K.

    The program developed and administered by Li Tong Group (LTG) maximizes value and sustainability of Motorola’s reverse supply chain management (RSCM) operations.
    Li Tong Group, LTG, which optimizes Reverse Supply Chain Management (RSCM) services for technology and telecom, is teaming up with Motorola to offer consumers in France, Germany and the U.K. an easy and convenient way to trade in the mobile devices they are no longer using. The program, launched May 1, 2015, will accept mobile products regardless of manufacturer.

    France: http://www.motorola.de/specials-de.html
    Germany: http://www.motorola.fr/specials-fr.html
    U.K.: http://www.motorola.co.uk/specials-uk.html

    The program has been developed to optimize both the value and sustainability of Motorola’s reverse supply chain management (RSCM) operations. Upon arrival at the processing facility, products are identified and separated by type. A data wipe is then performed according to Motorola-approved processes and software, with data-wipe reports generated in a format and at intervals designated by Motorola. After products are disassembled and separated, additional processes are performed based on the material type, such as shredding or smelting of precious metals. Finally, the raw materials are re-introduced into the supply chain when they are staged in the warehouse.

    In developing the take-back program, LTG built in an unusually high degree of transparency. A certificate of destruction is provided to Motorola for each serial number and/or batch processed by the program. Also, all downstream processors to which scrap materials are re-sold after processing are audited according to Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) standards.

    “We were very pleased to have the opportunity to work closely with a leader like Motorola to develop a program that serves its customers in France, Germany and the U.K.,” said Linda Li, LTG’s chief strategy officer. “It is a great example of the value LTG brings to the quickly evolving RSCM industry. By deploying our global reach, our deep engineering expertise and our experience with successful take-back program we’ve been able to help Motorola optimize value and sustainability in its RSCM operations.”
  • July 28, 2015   |   Eva Koo / TechNote How Cloud Computing And IoT Are Contributing To An E-Waste Crisis In China
    How Cloud Computing And IoT Are Contributing To
    An E-Waste Crisis In China

    A generation of changes can happen in the span of just nine months in China’s tech powerhouses. It’s the same development that is creating a huge problem for generations ahead; electrical waste.
    China’s electrical waste problem is a serious one. China dumped 6 million tonnes of e-waste in 2014, the second largest number in the world following the U.S., while it only collected only 1.3 million tonnes of equipment for recycling in 2013.

    Most e-waste in China is produced by home appliances. The country report on China’s e-waste in 2011 shows that the five major products include TVs, refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners and computers (desktop and laptop). As China has shown a sharp increase in mobile phone sales in recent years, it has become another main e-waste source.

    Since 2011, the ecosystem has changed, and there are a slew of new devices that could significantly worsen China’s e-waste issues.

    Based in Hong Kong, Li Tong Group (LTG) specializes in reverse supply chain management (RSCM) services for the leading technology and telecom companies in the world including Amazon, Apple and Huawei, according to TechNode’s research. When a used device is delivered to one of LTG’s global engineer-staffed facilities, it goes through screening, testing, and multiple device inspections to determine any problems of functionality. After data sanitization, the product can then be sold as a re-manufactured device. If OEMs are not interested in selling these devices, LTG can disassemble the parts and charge the OEMs for components which can then in turn be reused in other applications.
  • July 07, 2015   |   Hailey Lynne McKeefry, Editor in Chief / EBN Climbing the Reverse Logistics Mountain
    Climbing the Reverse Logistics Mountain
    In the past, reverse logistics was an unknown concept, and then considered a necessary evil. Now, OEMs have the potential to build a value chain that includes products at the end of their lives.

    In 2015, combined global spending on mobile devices and data center equipment reached $600 billion. Telecom equipment spending, meanwhile, will hit $247 billion in 2015, according to Infonetics Research. At the same time, other electronic product sectors, including smart devices and smart home appliances, are emerging to grow from a $51.5 billion global market in 2014 to $89.1 billion in 2017.
    In short, the world market is being flooded with electronic equipment that will one day reach its end of life. OEMs, then, need to look at ways to recycle, refurbish, and reuse these products and the associated components.
    "There's a snowball effect," said Linda Li, chief strategy officer at the Li Tong Group, a reverse logistics service provider. "The explosion of devices represents billions of products around the world. We've found that the average OEM spends 8% of revenue managing reverse supply chain functions."
    Further, regulatory concerns, including Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA), Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA) and Sarbanes–Oxley (SOX), are also on the rise. "Government and regulatory bodies are coming up with more and more strict laws and regulations on producer responsibility so there's a big demand for post-consumer take back and recycling," said Li.
  • June 30, 2015   |   EBN Newswire Li Tong Group (LTG) Opens New Warehouses
    Li Tong Group (LTG) Opens New Warehouses
    To cope with the expansion of GCS and the business development of Telecom Business Unit, LTG had acquired an extra warehouse of 113,000 sq. ft. in the New Territories, Hong Kong in May 2015.
    The opening ceremony of the new warehouse has taken place on 27th June 2015 on the site. Speech has been given by Group Director Tony Wong, with a celebratory gathering among staffs afterwards.
  • June 29, 2015   |   EBN Newswire Li Tong Group (LTG) Names Linda Li Chief Strategy Officer
    Li Tong Group (LTG) Names Linda Li
    Chief Strategy Officer

    HONG KONG –Li Tong Group, LTG, which optimizes Reverse Supply Chain Management (RSCM) services for technology and telecom, is pleased to announce the appointment of Linda Li to the position of chief strategy officer. In the new position, Li will continue to evolve LTG's role as a market leader in the RSCM field. Li, who is widely recognized as an expert in the field of green supply chain management, joined LTG in 2010 as corporate vice president. In 2013 she was named executive director and corporate vice president. In her four years with LTG she has pioneered the company's world-leading closed-loop recovery solution for mobile devices, devised the company's corporate growth strategies and led global initiatives and implementations.
  • June 10, 2015   |   EBN Newswire LTG Launches Microsoft’s First Consumer Trade-In Platform in Hong Kong Market
    LTG Launches Microsoft’s First Consumer
    Trade-In Platform in Hong Kong Market

    LTG, which optimizes Reverse Supply Chain Management (RSCM) services for technology and telecom, is teaming up with Microsoft Hong Kong to offer consumers an easy and convenient way to trade in mobile phones, laptops, game consoles and tablets for coupons that can be applied toward purchases of all products available at Microsoft's online store.

    Introduced in early May, the program is Hong Kong's first all-online electronic product trade-in service. The process begins with the consumer registering the product to be traded in, which is then picked up by a courier and delivered to a facility where its condition is tested. Next, based on that testing, LTG staff activate the e-coupon on the program's system, which is emailed to the consumer for use toward any purchase at Microsoft's online store.

    LTG's role draws on its proven strengths and expertise in managing trade-in programs for the world's leading hi-tech OEMs. In addition to providing the valuation of the devices that are traded in, LTG developed the program's website, which it hosts. LTG also works closely with Microsoft Hong Kong to coordinate and manage the program's overall operation and workflow.
  • June 10, 2015   |   Sam Jermy / Supply Chain Digital LTG launches innovative Microsoft trade-in platform in Hong Kong
    LTG launches innovative
    Microsoft trade-in platform
    in Hong Kong

    Li Tong Group, LTG, which optimises reverse supply chain management services for technology and telecomms, is teaming up with Microsoft Hong Kong to offer consumers an easy and convenient way to trade in mobile phones, laptops, game consoles and tablets for coupons that can be applied toward purchases of all products available at Microsoft’s online store.

    Introduced in early May, the program is Hong Kong’s first all-online electronic product trade-in service. The process begins with the consumer registering the product to be traded in, which is then picked up by a courier and delivered to a facility where its condition is tested. Next, based on that testing, LTG staff activate the e-coupon on the program’s system, which is emailed to the consumer for use toward any purchase at Microsoft’s online store.

    Linda Li, LTG’s Executive Director and Corporate Vice President, said: “All of us at LTG are proud to work with an industry leader such as Microsoft to offer consumers a convenient and hassle-free way to apply the value of their old technology toward purchases at Microsoft’s online store.

    “We are equally pleased to support Microsoft’s commitment to maximizing value throughout its supply chain with innovative offerings such as this trade-in program.”
  • June 01, 2015   |   LORETTA CHAO / The Wall Street Journal Supply Chain Experts Seek an Afterlife in Electronics
    Supply Chain Experts
    Seek an Afterlife in Electronics

    The spread of handheld electronics is creating a growing stockpile of e-waste, but some companies say there’s value in discarded goods

    As quickly as new smartphones, smartwatches and other mobile devices seem to come out these days, companies are scrambling to figure out how to take them apart.

    About 1.3 billion smartphones were sold worldwide in 2014, up 28% from 2013, and another 1.5 billion are expected to be sold this year, according to research firm IDC. And the growing number of connected devices is naturally followed by a growing amount of electronic waste, from the tiny components of hand-held electronics to massive cellphone towers. Companies need to dispose of the pieces without wasting valuable materials, damaging the environment—or spending a lot of money.

    Companies now spend an average of 8% to 10% of revenue maintaining reverse supply-chain functions, according to Linda Li, vice president at a Hong Kong-based Li Tong Group, a specialist in flipping logistics around and managing the handling of goods once they are discarded... LTG is hired by contract manufacturers and vendors of electronics and equipment to collect some 200,000 metric tons of e-waste a year to be destroyed—sometimes under careful watch of intellectual property owners—harvested for components, or broken down into raw materials for recycling.

    For all new devices coming out, we are already figuring out a way to handle it later on.—Linda Li, Li Tong Group
  • January 09, 2015   |   Robert J. Bowman / SupplyChainBrain What Will We Do With All That Electronic Waste?
    What Will We Do With
    All That Electronic Waste?

    Despite the popularity of global recycling programs, we’re a long way from solving the problem of what to do with the waste from discarded business and consumer electronic devices. As much as 85 percent of electronic products were discarded in landfills or incinerators last year. And the release of the iPhone 6 has brought the issue to a “tipping point,” says Linda Li, executive director and corporate vice president of strategy with Li Tong Group. On this podcast, she discusses where previous recycling efforts have fallen short, and why we’re still not deriving maximum use from the materials contained in old devices. Li argues for a "closed-loop" approach to managing e-waste supply chains – "the Holy Grail of the recycling business." Hosted by Bob Bowman, Managing Editor of SupplyChainBrain.
  • November 17, 2014   |   Andrew Burger / Triple Pundit Reverse Supply Chain Management ‘Closes the Loop’ on Waste
    Reverse Supply Chain Management
    ‘Closes the Loop’ on Waste

    Some of the world’s largest multinational businesses have recognized the advantages ‘closing the loop’ on their supply chains can provide. From energy and water conservation to materials reuse and recycling, they’re achieving significant gains in operating efficiency and productivity as they move toward becoming ‘zero-waste‘ and ‘zero emissions’ businesses.

    Mimicking natural ecosystems, commercial and industrial ecosystems are emerging — in which an increasing percentage of products, their components, and raw or intermediate materials are being reused or recycled. The ultimate goal - cradle-to-cradle product lifecycles in which all materials used to produce, package and distribute products to consumers are recaptured, reused or recycled - is edging closer to reality. Offering post-consumer takeback and recycling, enterprise IT and telecom asset management, and 3R solutions for mobile devices, Hong Kong-based Li Tong Group owns and operates 15 reverse supply chain facilities worldwide. From an OEM customer base in the consumer electronics sector, Li Tong is intent on expanding its reverse supply chain business across other industry sectors, Linda Li, a Li Tong executive director and corporate VP for strategy, told 3p in an interview.
  • October 28, 2014   |   Bay Area, CA, USA LTG is the gold sponsor of the 8th Annual Hi-Tech & Electronics Summit
    LTG is the gold sponsor of the 8th Annual Hi-Tech & Electronics Summit
    Li Tong Group (LTG) is the gold sponsor of the 8th Annual Hi-Tech & Electronics Summit, October 28th, Bay Area, CA, and will exhibit during the summit. Linda Li, Executive Director and Corporate Vice President of Li Tong Group will give a speech in the summit.

    This summit is a great platform for bringing together the industry’s influencers for discussion on the industry’s current state and future.
  • October 27, 2014   |   San Francisco, Calif. LTG to Discuss Electronic Remanufacturing Best Practices at the Hi-Tech & Electronic Supply Chain Summit
    LTG to Discuss Electronic Remanufacturing
    Best Practices at the Hi-Tech
    & Electronic Supply Chain Summit

    LTG (Li Tong Group), one of the largest Reverse Supply Chain Management (RSCM) services provider for technology and telecom in the Asia-Pacific region, will be presenting at the Hi-Tech & Electronic Supply Chain Summit in San Francisco tomorrow. The presentation will focus on how technology companies can leverage RSCM solutions to reduce materials management costs by millions of dollars and make design-for-recycle practices a positive contributor to profit margins.

    Linda Li, executive director and corporate vice president at LTG, will share insights from the company’s 14 years of experience creating integrated RSCM solutions for manufacturers, OEM’s and other customers in more than 20 countries that reduce landfill use rates by more than 95 percent, as well as make global supply chain networks more efficient. LTG maintains extensive global relationships with manufacturers, suppliers, end-users and participants in secondary markets, and operates 15 wholly-owned facilities globally, providing post-industrial and post-consumer recovery, materials and component optimization design-for-recycle programs, reporting and compliance strategies, among other services.
  • September 01, 2014   |    LTG gained R2/RIOS™, the first and only company in APAC with the highest standards for electronics recycling industry
    LTG gained R2/RIOS™, the first
    and only company in APAC with the highest standards
    for electronics recycling industry

    After a series of rigorous and independent auditing, LTG has been granted R2/RIOS™, becoming the first and only company which gained this recognition in Asia-Pacific.

    R2 is the leading standard for electronics repair and recycling. The R2 Standard provides a common set of processes, safety measures, and documentation requirements for businesses that repair and recycle used electronics. R2 demonstrates to customers that electronics are being recycled with the highest standards for data privacy, environmental controls, employee health and safety and corporate responsibility.
  • July 31, 2014   |   MIS-Asia LTG Gets NAID AAA Certification
    LTG Gets NAID AAA Certification
    LTG in Hong Kong is the first IT asset management firm in Asia to earn the NAID AAA Certification for Sanitation Operations, according to a press statement by the National Association for Information Destruction (NAID) based in Phoenix, AZ, the US.

    The press statement by this non-profit certification provider said this means that LTG's capability to meet regulatory requirements for third-party IT asset management and computer recycling services providers has been validated.

    It also noted that the recently amended Hong Kong Personal Data (Privacy) Ordinance (PDPO) holds data controllers responsible for the compliance of third parties and has issued new regulations with regard to outsourcing.

    There are today 1000 NAID-certified operations in the US, Canada, South Africa and Australia, according to the statement.

 

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